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Global Work Glossary

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Table of Contents

What distinguishes an exempt vs. non-exempt employee?

How do you determine if an employee should be classified as non-exempt?

What are the legal implications of misclassifying an employee as exempt?

How do overtime regulations work for non-exempt employees?

Can non-exempt employees be required to work more than 40 hours a week?

How should employers track hours for non-exempt employees?

What role do non-exempt employees play in global hiring and a global workforce?

How do remote work policies affect non-exempt employees?

What are some best practices for managing non-exempt employees?

How can employers ensure compliance with FLSA regulations for non-exempt employees?

What are some strategies to improve job satisfaction for non-exempt employees?

How can the performance of non-exempt employees be measured and improved?

How Deel can help

What is a non-exempt employee

A non-exempt employee is a worker who is entitled to earn at least the federal minimum wage and receive overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek, as stipulated by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

What distinguishes an exempt vs. non-exempt employee?

This employee classification is based on the type of work performed, the level of responsibility, and the employee's salary. The main difference between exempt and non-exempt employees is their eligibility for overtime pay.

Non-exempt employees must be compensated with overtime pay at a rate of at least one and a half times their regular hourly rate for any time worked over the standard 40-hour workweek. They are typically paid on an hourly basis, but they can also be salaried employees.

Exempt employees are not entitled to overtime provisions, regardless of the number of hours worked. They are almost always salaried and are typically executives, professional employees, outside sales team members, computer employees, or administrative employees. Learn more about exemption under the FLSA from the US Department of Labor (DOL).

How do you determine if an employee should be classified as non-exempt?

To determine if an employee should receive non-exempt status, employers must evaluate the job duties, salary level, and salary basis of the position in question. The FLSA provides specific criteria for each of these categories. If an employee does not meet the exemption criteria, such as managing a department, regularly exercising discretion and independent judgment, or earning above a certain salary threshold, they are usually classified as non-exempt.

Misclassifying an employee as exempt when they should be non-exempt can lead to significant legal and financial repercussions. Employers may be required to pay back wages, including overtime, and could face penalties, fines, and damages for violating labor laws. It's essential for employers to conduct regular audits and seek legal counsel when classifying employees to ensure compliance with FLSA regulations.

How do overtime regulations work for non-exempt employees?

Overtime for non-exempt employees is calculated based on hours worked over 40 in a single workweek. The FLSA mandates that non-exempt employees must be paid at least one and a half times their regular hourly wage for any overtime hours. Some states may have additional overtime rules, such as requiring double-time pay for certain circumstances, which employers must also follow.

Can non-exempt employees be required to work more than 40 hours a week?

Yes, non-exempt employees can be required to work more than 40 hours a week as long as they are compensated with overtime pay according to the FLSA requirements. Employers should, however, be mindful of any applicable state laws that may place further restrictions on mandatory overtime.

How should employers track hours for non-exempt employees?

Employers can implement timekeeping systems to track the hours worked by non-exempt employees. This can include traditional time clocks, digital time-tracking software, or other reliable methods that ensure compliance with wage and hour laws. Accurate record-keeping is crucial for both calculating overtime pay and providing evidence of compliance in the event of an audit or legal dispute.

What role do non-exempt employees play in global hiring and a global workforce?

In the context of a worldwide workforce, it’s crucial to recognize that non-exempt employees in the United States are governed by specific labor laws. Employers need to be well-versed in and adhere to the wage and hour regulations applicable to non-exempt staff in the US. This intricacy can significantly influence global hiring approaches, requiring companies to adjust their policies to align with diverse international labor standards.

How do remote work policies affect non-exempt employees?

Remote work policies for non-exempt employees must ensure that wage and hour laws are still being followed. Employers need to provide clear guidelines on work hours, break times, and overtime authorization for remote, non-exempt employees. Additionally, employers should establish methods for accurately tracking and recording work hours to prevent wage and hour violations.

What are some best practices for managing non-exempt employees?

To effectively manage non-exempt employees, you need to establish clear work expectations, maintain accurate timekeeping records, provide FLSA compliance training for managers, and conduct regular job classification reviews. Human resources departments should also establish fair and transparent policies for overtime work and ensure that non-exempt employees understand their responsibilities and protections.

How can employers ensure compliance with FLSA regulations for non-exempt employees?

To ensure compliance with FLSA regulations for non-exempt employees, employers should conduct periodic audits of their wage and hour practices, provide training on FLSA requirements, and stay informed about changes in state laws and federal laws. Additionally, employers should consult with legal experts in labor law to verify that their policies and practices align with current regulations.

Companies can also use an employer of record, such as Deel, to ensure all employees are hired compliantly, no matter their location.

What are some strategies to improve job satisfaction for non-exempt employees?

Employers can support non-exempt employees by offering competitive wages, providing opportunities for skill development and career advancement, recognizing and rewarding hard work, ensuring a safe and positive work environment, and fostering open communication. Employers can also offer flexibility in scheduling and consider benefits that specifically cater to the needs of non-exempt workers.

How can the performance of non-exempt employees be measured and improved?

Performance of non-exempt employees can be measured through regular evaluations, productivity metrics, and quality of work assessments. To improve performance, business owners can provide targeted training programs, set clear performance goals, offer constructive feedback, and implement incentive programs. It's important for employers to align performance improvement strategies with the specific job titles and responsibilities of non-exempt employees.

How Deel can help

By understanding and effectively managing non-exempt employees, organizations can ensure legal compliance, optimize workforce productivity, and contribute to a supportive and fair work environment that benefits both the team and the overall business. With Deel, you can simplify the hiring, onboarding, and managing of various employees across the world. Book a demo to learn more.

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