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Global Work Glossary

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Table of Contents

What is the purpose of a work visa?

What is the difference between a work visa and a work permit?

What is the process of obtaining a work visa?

Can family members accompany work visa holders?

How is a work visa relevant to HR?

How can HR improve the work visa process?

What are the potential legal issues with work visas?

Can a work visa be extended or renewed?

What happens if a work visa is denied?

How does a work visa impact global hiring?

How do work visas affect the global workforce?

What role does a work visa play in remote work?

What is a US work visa?

Is a US green card a type of work visa?

What is a work visa

A work visa is a government-issued document that allows a foreign individual to legally work in a country where they are not a citizen.

What is the purpose of a work visa?

This type of visa aims to ensure that foreign nationals working in a country are doing so legally. It is a tool governments use to regulate the employment of non-citizens and ensure compliance with immigration laws. A work visa also protects foreign workers’ rights, guaranteeing they are entitled to the same labor protections as local employees.

A work visa is a category of nonimmigrant visa. Nonimmigrant work visas typically last for a predetermined period of time. After this, the visa holder must return to their home country or apply for an extension or renewal if viable.

What is the difference between a work visa and a work permit?

While often used interchangeably, there can be differences. A work visa generally refers to a document allowing entry into a country for employment purposes. A work permit, on the other hand, is typically a document granted by a specific country's government, allowing a foreign national already in the country to work. The exact definitions can vary by country.

What is the process of obtaining a work visa?

The process varies by country but typically involves an application submitted to the host country’s embassy or consulate. The applicant must provide various documents to confirm their eligibility, including proof of employment, a passport, and sometimes health records. There may also be an application fee to pay. Processing times can vary significantly. 

Often, the employer sponsors the visa by confirming the job offer and the applicant’s qualifications.

Learn more: A Guide to EOR-Sponsored Visas for Enterprise Businesses

Can family members accompany work visa holders?

Family members such as the spouse and dependent children (usually under a certain age) can often accompany work visa holders. However, the specific eligibility and process can vary depending on the country and the type of work visa held. 

How is a work visa relevant to HR?

Work visas are crucial for HR professionals involved in global hiring. They must ensure that potential foreign employees possess the correct work visas to legally work in the host country. HR must also assist with the visa application process, including sponsorship procedures and documentation, ensuring compliance with employment and immigration laws.

Learn more: How to Handle Worker-Led Relocation Requests in Your Enterprise Business

How can HR improve the work visa process?

HR can streamline the work visa process by being proactive, well-organized, and knowledgeable about immigration laws. This involves early initiation of the process, maintaining clear communication with employees, and ensuring all documents are correctly filled out and submitted on time. 

Deel’s HR platform, with visa and immigration support can help HR teams help manage and track visa application processes.

Learn more: Employee Visa Application Guide for Enterprises

Non-compliance with immigration laws, such as employing someone without a valid work visa, can lead to severe penalties for businesses, including fines and reputational damage.

Can a work visa be extended or renewed?

Yes, most employment-based work visas can be extended or renewed, but this often requires the visa holder to undergo a new application process and continued sponsorship from the employer. HR must monitor visa expiration dates and assist employees with renewal processes to avoid lapses in legal work status.

Learn more: 4 Steps to Simplify Visa Renewal for Enterprise Employees

What happens if a work visa is denied?

If a work visa is denied, the applicant is generally not permitted to legally work in the host country. Reasons for denial can include incomplete applications, lack of employer sponsorship, or failure to meet the host country's requirements. In such cases, HR must explore alternative options, such as different visa types or remote work arrangements.

Learn more: US Visa Denials, Refusals, Rejections, and Other Roadblocks

How does a work visa impact global hiring?

Work visas are a fundamental aspect of global hiring. They allow businesses to tap into a wider talent pool, bringing diverse skills and perspectives. However, they also add a layer of complexity to the hiring process, with additional legal requirements and potential delays. 

Learn more: Improving Talent Acquisition and Retention with Location Flexibility

How do work visas affect the global workforce?

Work visas enable the mobility of the global workforce, allowing individuals to work where their skills are most needed or valued. This can lead to increased diversity and innovation in the workplace. However, visa restrictions can also limit this mobility, impacting both individuals and businesses.

Learn more: Win-Win Employee Relocations: How Enterprises Can Streamline Strategic Moves

What role does a work visa play in remote work?

With the rise of remote work, work visas are becoming less of a barrier for global hiring. However, they are still relevant. Some countries have introduced "digital nomad" visas for remote workers. Additionally, tax and labor laws remain tied to physical location, so even remote workers may require a work visa.

What is a US work visa?

A US work visa is a legal authorization that permits foreign individuals to work temporarily in the United States for a US employer, subject to specific conditions and requirements.

There are many different types of US work visas, including: 

H-1B visa: This visa is for skilled workers in specialty occupations, often in technology, engineering, and science.

H-B2 visa: This visa is for foreign workers to fill non-agricultural, seasonal job positions when there is a shortage of U.S. workers.

L-1 visa: Designed for intracompany transferees, it allows multinational companies to transfer employees from a foreign office to a US office.

O visa: For individuals with extraordinary ability or achievement in arts, sciences, education, business, or athletics.

TN visa: Specifically for Canadian and Mexican citizens working in certain professional occupations under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

E visa: For treaty traders and investors engaged in substantial trade or investment activities between their home country and the US.

H-2A visa: Temporary agricultural workers, typically for seasonal or peak labor needs in the agricultural sector.

H-2B visa: Non-agricultural temporary workers, often used for seasonal labor shortages in industries like hospitality and construction.

J-1 visa: Exchange visitors participating in approved exchange programs, including work and travel programs.

F visa optional practical training (OPT): Allows international students on F-1 visas to work in their field of study for a specified period after graduation.

M visa practical training: Similar to F visa OPT but for students on M-1 visas (vocational and non-academic programs).

Is a US green card a type of work visa?

No, a green card is not a type of work visa. While both a green card (officially known as a lawful permanent resident card) and a work visa allow foreign individuals to live and work in the US, they are distinct in that a green card grants permanent residency in the USA and the freedom to work in any job or profession, without restrictions based on employment type or duration.

Whether you need a temporary work visa or a Green Card, we acquired the leading US immigration provider, Legalpad, so you can help your team move to the US.

Disclaimer: This content is provided for general informational purposes and should not be treated as legal advice.

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