description-icon

Article

9 minutes

Essential Employee Peer Review Questions

HR & workforce management

Author

Lorelei Trisca

Published

July 22, 2024

Last Update

July 22, 2024

Table of Contents

Scale questions for employee peer reviews

Open-ended questions for employee peer reviews

Behavioral questions for employee peer reviews

Best practices for formulating bias-free peer review questions for employees

Collect peer feedback in just a few clicks with Deel Engage

Key Takeaways
  1. Peer reviews are a critical process in various fields to enhance the quality and reliability of work through constructive feedback and evaluation by peers.
  2. By selecting the right feedback questions to ask peers, you can ensure that your peer review process is effective and objective, leading to improved performance and growth.
  3. Well-defined questions help mitigate biases, ensure consistency, and provide actionable feedback.
  4. Deel Engage’s automated workflows can help you implement a peer review process in record time.

Employee peer reviews can be a powerful tool for driving collaboration, promoting employee development, and improving team dynamics. However, the process can be challenging, from navigating personal biases and subjective opinions to ensuring that feedback is constructive and actionable.

By asking the right questions, you can ensure your review process gathers valuable insights about employee performance and personal and professional growth.

This article will share 50+ employee peer review questions to help you overcome challenges and inspire and motivate your team.

Scale questions for employee peer reviews

Scale questions are easy to answer, so include a couple of these to get your employees started on the review.

It’s vital to ensure that your scale questions are clear and specific and that the rating scale you use is consistent throughout the questionnaire.

  1. On a scale of 1 to 10, how well does your coworker handle stress and pressure? (1 = Not well at all, 10 = Extremely well)
  2. How often does your coworker meet project deadlines? (1 = Never, 5 = Always)
  3. On a scale of 1 to 10, how effectively does your coworker communicate within the team? (1 = Not effectively at all, 10 = Extremely effectively)
  4. On a scale of 1 to 10, how well does the employee handle and adapt to change? (1 = Not well at all, 10 = Extremely well)
  5. How effective is the employee at problem-solving on a scale of 1 to 5? (1 = Not effective at all, 5 = Extremely effective)
  6. On a scale of 1 to 10, how well does the employee demonstrate leadership skills? (1 = Not well at all, 10 = Extremely well)
  7. How often does the employee contribute new ideas and initiatives on a scale of 1 to 5? (1 = Never, 5 = Always)
  8. On a scale of 1 to 10, how well does the employee manage their workload? (1 = Not well at all, 10 = Extremely well)
  9. How well does the employee receive and act on feedback on a scale of 1 to 5? (1 = Not well at all, 5 = Extremely well)
  10. On a scale of 1 to 5, how well does the employee communicate with colleagues across teams? (1 = Not well at all, 5 = Extremely well)
  11. Rate the employee’s ability to manage their time and prioritize tasks on a scale of 1 to 10. (1 = Very poorly, 10 = Extremely well)
  12. Rate the employee’s adaptability and flexibility in dealing with changes and challenges on a scale of 1 to 10. (1 = Not well at all, 10 = Extremely well)
  13. How would you rate the employee’s problem-solving skills? (1 = Very poor, 10 = Excellent)
  14. On a scale of 1 to 7, how well does the employee demonstrate ethical behavior and integrity in their work? (1 = Not at all, 7 = Very well)
  15. How often does your peer go above and beyond to support a colleague or client? (1 = Never, 5 = Always)
Complimentary resource

If you’re setting up your peer review process for the first time, check out our ultimate employee peer review guide. It has everything you need to put your peer review questions to work.

Open-ended questions for employee peer reviews

Open-ended questions provide enough space for employees to provide detailed and thoughtful responses.

  1. What do you believe are the employee’s greatest strengths?
  2. What specific examples of projects or tasks demonstrate your coworker’s strengths?
  3. Can you identify any areas for improvement in your coworker’s work performance? If so, what are they?
  4. How does your coworker contribute to the team and work environment?
  5. In what ways has your coworker made a positive impact on the company or team?
  6. What are some specific examples of the employee’s contributions to the team or organization this year?
  7. How does the employee’s work contribute to the overall success of the team or organization?
  8. Can you provide a specific instance where your peer’s collaboration led to a successful team outcome?
  9. In what areas has your peer demonstrated growth or improvement over the past review period?
  10. In what areas could your peer benefit from additional training or development?
  11. How did your peer respond to setbacks or challenges?
  12. What are some areas where the employee could improve their communication or collaboration skills?
  13. How does the employee approach problem-solving, and are there any areas where they could improve?
  14. What are some areas where the employee has gone above and beyond their job duties?
  15. Does the employee demonstrate leadership skills? Can you give at least one example?
  16. How does the employee contribute to a positive work culture? Can you provide a specific example?
  17. Are there any areas where your peer could improve with regard to contributing to a positive workplace culture?
  18. Can you describe a situation where the employee demonstrated exceptional teamwork or collaboration?
  19. How well does the peer align their work with the organization’s goals and values?
  20. How has the employee contributed to the success of a project or initiative?
Deel Engage
Build high-performing teams with half the work
Retain top talent and foster a culture of high performance with our AI-powered people suite to manage development, performance, and training programs from one single place.

Behavioral questions for employee peer reviews

Behavioral questions can provide more specific examples of an employee’s strengths and areas for improvement.

Therefore, it’s important to ask open-ended questions that allow the reviewer to provide specific examples of behavior rather than generalizations.

  1. How does your coworker handle conflicts or disagreements with other team members? Can you provide a specific example?
  2. Can you describe a situation where your coworker faced a difficult problem and how they approached it?
  3. How does your coworker handle receiving feedback and constructive criticism on their work performance? Can you provide an example?
  4. How would you describe your coworker’s work style, and how does it impact the team?
  5. Can you provide a specific instance where the employee demonstrated solid problem-solving skills?
  6. How does the employee respond to feedback, and can you provide an example?
  7. How does the employee handle challenging situations in the workplace, and can you provide an example?
  8. How does the employee approach collaborating with others on projects? Can you provide an example?
  9. Can you describe a specific instance where the employee demonstrated strong leadership skills?
  10. How does the employee manage their workload? Can you provide an example of when they effectively managed multiple tasks or projects?
  11. How does the employee contribute to a positive work culture? Can you provide an example?
  12. Can you describe a specific instance where the employee went above and beyond their duties?
  13. How does the employee approach decision-making, and can you provide an example of a decision that positively impacted the team or organization?
  14. Can you describe a specific instance where the employee demonstrated strong communication skills, either written or verbal?
  15. Can you provide an example of when this peer took the initiative or ownership of a task or project?
  16. Describe a situation where the employee demonstrated resilience or adaptability when facing challenges or setbacks.
  17. Can you provide an example of when the employee effectively managed a conflict or difficult situation with a colleague?
  18. How well does your peer demonstrate an understanding of the company’s cultural values in their daily work? Can you provide an example?

Free template

Core competency matrix for any industry
With 50 universal competencies and strategic details for effective performance management, our core competency matrix is the ultimate resource for developing the skill sets essential for any industry.

These questions are a starting point you can adapt or modify depending on the specific situation and context of the peer review.

Best practices for formulating bias-free peer review questions for employees

In any workplace, interpersonal dynamics can influence how employees perceive and evaluate one another. This can lead to biases where some employees get overly praised while others’ achievements do not receive the same appreciation. Design peer review questions carefully to mitigate such biases and ensure the collection of meaningful, objective feedback that aligns with company values. Here are the best practices for formulating bias-free peer review questions.

Ask questions that are goal-specific and open-ended

Focus on specific and measurable criteria for the current role rather than subjective factors like personality. When framing questions, use open-ended phrasing to get deeper insights rather than yes-or-no responses.

Example: Ask, “What did you observe in your peer’s approach to problem-solving?” instead of “Did your peer handle problems effectively?”

Tip: Encourage responders to back up their feedback with concrete examples, as it emphasizes constructive feedback and limits the influence of personal biases.

Don’t suggest answers

Ask questions that require the employee to make their points and provide specific examples of behavior or actions rather than asking leading questions that may influence the employee’s response.

Example: Rather than asking, “Do you think your peer’s punctuality is good?” ask, “Can you provide an example of your peer’s punctuality in the past month?”

Maintain a consistent format

Remain consistent in the format of performance review questions for everyone, ensuring equal ground for assessment and keeping the evaluation process transparent.

Example: Use the same set of questions for all employees, adjusting only for role-specific competencies.

Free template

Unlock employee potential with competency-based performance reviews
Start giving your employees tailored feedback and development opportunities to achieve their full potential. Enhance your performance management process today.

Use clear and objective language

Avoid using words or phrases that are subjective or open to interpretation, such as “lazy,” “difficult to work with,” or “smart.” Instead, use specific and objective language that subtly probes into behavior or actions.

Example: Instead of “Is this employee hard-working?” ask, “How does this employee manage their workload and meet deadlines?”

Use inclusive language

Ensure your questions are inclusive, and avoid using language that may exclude specific individuals or groups.

Example: Instead of using “he” or “she” to refer to an employee, use gender-neutral pronouns like “they” or “their.”

Focus on behaviors and outcomes

Center your questions around observable behaviors and outcomes rather than personal traits or characteristics. This approach minimizes subjective judgments and enhances the accuracy of the feedback.

Example: Ask, “What specific actions did this employee take to contribute to the project’s success?” rather than “Is this employee a good team player?”

Encourage specificity and examples

Specific feedback supported by examples is more constructive and less likely to be influenced by personal biases.

Example: “Can you describe a situation where this employee demonstrated leadership skills?” instead of “Is this employee a good leader?”

By incorporating these best practices into your peer review process, you can create a more objective, fair, and constructive evaluation system that benefits both employees and the organization.

Before Deel Engage, running peer reviews was incredibly painful, taking up to 20 hours per cycle. Now, I won’t spend more than a couple of minutes per cycle per year.

Laney Scale,

Human Resources Business Partner, Aquatic

Deel success stories

Learn how Aquatic uses Deel Engage as their go-to talent management platform, saving 180+ hours automating feedback processes alone.

Read the case study

Collect peer feedback in just a few clicks with Deel Engage

You currently have a list of potent questions in your hand, making it easy to draft your peer-review survey. To increase efficiency, automate your peer review cycles. Here is how Deel Engage will help you:

  • Deel Engage’s 360 feedback software makes it incredibly easy to create comprehensive feedback cycles
  • The platform is intuitive and flexible—you can decide whether the feedback is anonymous and set up automated feedback cycles for new hires
  • With learning scientists on board to support implementation with best practices, you can be confident that you’re getting the most out of the tool

Additionally, Deel HR, our truly global HRIS solution, is always included for free.

Book a demo to see how our solutions will help you build a high-performance workforce.

Related resources

deel logo
twitterlinkedin (1)facebookinstagram

How it works

© Copyright 2024. All Rights Reserved.